Rigorous Curriculum from World-Class Academic Providers

Discussion-Based Classes

Research shows that stand-and-deliver classrooms are markedly less likely to deliver student success than those which actively engage students with discussions or group activities. The courses delivered by Verto’s Academic Providers are organized around activities that prioritize stimulating and active learning methods to keep students engaged. This is made possible by our commitment to small class sizes of generally less than 25 students.

Experiential Learning

At Verto in partnership with our Academic Providers, we believe that learning happens best when students are actively engaged in the world around them, applying and assessing the ideas they read about and discuss in the classroom. That is why The Verto Experience emphasizes experiences outside the classroom. Hands-on, experiential activities include service learning, field trips, and presentations or panel discussions with local non-governmental organizations or community leaders.

A Diverse and Inclusive Curriculum

The curriculum provided by Verto’s Academic Providers is based on a foundational commitment to diversity and inclusion. All courses are intentionally designed to ensure that students are exposed to a broad range of perspectives and experiences while also being cognizant of the danger of a single story. Courses are specific to location with added emphasis on how students’ travel semesters impact the local community.

Differentiated Instruction

We value a participant body with diverse backgrounds and differing experiences but are also aware that participants will have varied learning strengths, needs, and interests. We therefore provide the relevant support to ensure that all participants succeed and thrive with Verto. Whether it be providing scaffolding to bridge learning gaps for those that need them, or assignments and assessments that challenge more advanced students, our goal is for everyone to be in their stretch zone. Our staff and student success coordinators meet students where they are to ensure everyone remains challenged but not panicked (or bored!) by their coursework.

Holistic Education

Learning should not just be about cultivating academic skills and intellectual knowledge. It should also be about building “non-cognitive” skills like self-awareness, social awareness, and responsible decision-making. Prioritizing collaboration, community-building, shared norms, and open and vulnerable dialogue, our courses promote not only academic but also social and emotional learning.

Verto’s mission is to help participants discover themselves and the world around them by making international education a foundational and accessible part of a four-year college degree. At the heart of our mission is the concept that international travel is in itself transformational and educational. When we pair incredible experiences outside the classroom with world-class curriculum delivered by highly respected Academic Providers, we get a Verto experience specifically designed so that all participants gain academic, social, and emotional skills required to not only thrive in college but to also make a positive and responsible impact in our wider diverse and global society. 

Catalog of Courses Available from Academic Provider

Language Arts

Digital Literacies

Course Description:

What does it mean to be a reader and writer in the 21st Century? Technology is changing the way we read and write as well as what we read and write. In this class, we investigate blogging, online resumes, social media profiles, websites, wikis, forums, and other platforms. Students will explore concepts related to contemporary writing & media, as well as creating persuasive arguments in digital spaces.

Credits: 3

Suggested Designation Mapping: ENGL, COMM

Download Example Syllabus

Intermediate Spanish I

Course Description:

This course offers students practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Spanish at the intermediate level, with more advanced grammar, as well as opportunities to explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. In addition to refining grammatical concepts introduced in Elementary Spanish I and II, students learn more challenging grammatical structures such as the subjunctive in noun clauses, adjective clauses, and adverbial clauses.

  • Credits: 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: SPAN
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Interpersonal Communication

Course Description:

A practical course in the theories and elements involved in interpersonal communication. Study of the factors, which influence our ability to effectively communicate, development of relationships, the role of the self in communication, the resolution of conflict and communication on the job and in daily life.

Credits: 3

Suggested Designation Mapping: ENGL, COMM

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Introduction to Creative Writing

Course Description:

Designed for the student who wants to become a creative writer, this course will provide a foundation for further exploration and practice in poetry, fiction, and/or drama. Through critical analysis of works written by notable writers, elements of literature, and examination of the writers-reader relationship, students will gain the tools to begin crafting their own creative works and to identify their voices as writers.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: ENGL
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Introductory Spanish I

Course Description:

This course blends a focus on communication with grammatical rigor and vocabulary acquisition in a real-world Spanish immersion context. By the end of the semester, students successfully completing the course will be able to converse in Spanish about themselves and common topics daily life, and generalize knowledge and negotiate during conversations to convey meaning. Students will also correspond in written Spanish to convey information about themselves and their day-to-day experiences, and read brief passages highlighting general information on the host country and important topics in the country’s society and cultures.

During class seminars, students will be exposed to Spanish in different communicative situations and will engage with the language in different manners, ranging from simply reacting to input in the form of audio or texts, to negotiating their way through a task. Spanish will be the primary language of instruction and the majority of class time will be spent on task-based, communicative activities where students are expected to use the target language to the best of their abilities.

  • Credits: 4 or 5
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: SPAN
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Introductory Spanish II

Course Description:

A continuing course from Spanish I with more emphasis on oral communication, writing and reading, grammatical elements, along with exploration of the cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world.

  • Credits: 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: SPAN
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Public Speaking

Course Description:

This course includes basic principles and practices of public speaking: developing proficiency and self-confidence in speaking. Focus will also include organization, development and communication of ideas, structure, style, and delivery. This course covers theory and techniques of public speaking in democratic society. Discovery, development, and criticism of ideas in public discourse through research, reasoning, organization, composition, presentation, and evaluation of various types of speeches including informative and persuasive speeches. The course also develops critical listening skills through performance and evaluation.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: COMM
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Rhetoric and Research I

Course Description:

The purpose of Rhetoric and Research is to prepare you as a writer for college assignments and for the writing demands in your personal, professional, and civic lives. Students will critically read and write in a variety of rhetorical situations and contexts and incorporate college-level research. Specifically, we’ll learn how writing is:

(i) a communicative act that always occurs within a particular context and with a particular purpose;

(ii) a process (rather than a one-time act) in which reading, feedback and revision helps us realize the full potential of our written works; and

(iii) a communal act, for we always write to engage with an audience.

Students read and discuss a variety of works from different literary genres, focusing on nonfiction and expository texts, reading 30-60 or more pages per week. The course also emphasizes research skills, including evaluating and documenting sources, using MLA style, practicing academic integrity, and job document preparation for employment. Students write several essays in expository and argumentative prose, including at least one research paper, in response to class reading and outside research, for a total of between 6,000-8,000 words.

  • Credits: 3 or 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: ENGL
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Principles of Communication

Course Description: This course is a practical, hands-on experience in which students will actively participate in each class. Through the lens of their own journey to date as human beings and on-going self-discovery, students will become acquainted with the major aspects and types of communication:  basic elements of the communication process, perception, listening, verbal communication, nonverbal communication, interpersonal communication, intercultural communication, small group communication, and mass/technologically-mediated communication.  The goal of the course is to equip students with outstanding communication skills for use in real-world applications.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: COMM
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Arts & Humanities

American Literature II

Course Description: This course introduces students to a wide range of American authors and their relationship to major literary and intellectual movements from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: ENGL
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Art History I

Course Description:An introductory survey of objects, images, and architecture from the ancient world through the Middle Ages. The course emphasizes the importance of religious, social, and political influences on the art of prehistoric, Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, early Christian, Byzantine and Medieval European cultures. It also develops and enhances students’ ability to understand works of art in their social and historical contexts.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  ART
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Art History II

Course Description: A survey of the major visual arts from the Renaissance through the modern world. Course emphasis on understanding of geographically relevant information, art media, techniques, etc., and the development of an historical understanding based on western history as understood through the study of art.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  ART
Download Example Syllabus

Beginning Digital Photography

Course Description: The exploration of photography as an art form using digital tools and software. Emphasis is balanced between technical skill and the creative process. In-class exercises, out-of-class shooting assignments, and group critiques. A basic digital camera is required.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  ART
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Beginning Drawing

Course Description:Be introduced to the principles, elements, and practices of drawing, while exploring a wide range of subject matter and drawing media. In this course, you will focus on perceptually based drawing, observational skills, technical abilities, and creative responses to materials and subject matter while living and learning in la culla del Rinascimento (the cradle of the Renaissance).

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  ART
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British Literature II

Course Description:  This survey course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: ENGL
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Comparative Religion

Course Description: A historical investigation of the world’s major religions (Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity). Attention will be given to the origins, history, mythology, and culture of various belief systems.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: PHIL, REL, SOC
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Film Appreciation

Course Description: 

This introductory course explores the world of film and filmmaking. We will examine the narrative and stylistic techniques used in filmmaking in order to more fully understand how meaning is constructed, conveyed, and interpreted in film. The course also examines film genre studies, film criticism, the international film scene, and the concept of media literacy.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: THEA, DRAM, COMM
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Introduction to Ethics

Course Description: This course is intended to acquaint students with the practical relevance of ethics within everyday life and to aid them in cultivating the skills inherent in ethical reasoning. It is an examination of the basic concepts of morality and values, representative ethical theories and their application to important contemporary moral problems. Topics may include abortion, suicide, euthanasia, gun control, homosexuality, affirmative action, capital punishment, cloning humans and other biotech issues, the war on drugs, terrorism and our responsibilities to the environment.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: PHIL
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Introduction to Philosophy

Course Description:This course is intended to serve as an introduction to Philosophy as an academic field of study, an art of personal reflection, and a tool for dialogue. In this light, it examines a few perennial philosophical questions and the major arguments and positions which fall under these questions such as: Who am I? What is a person? Are we really free? Is there life after death? What sort of meaning is possible in life? Films and literature may be utilized to reveal how the art of philosophical reflection extends beyond canonical philosophical texts. Emphasis will be placed on well reasoned justification and evaluation.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: PHIL
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Introduction to Theatre

Course Description: A survey course designed to foster appreciation for the theatre by students not majoring in drama, and to solidify a foundation for drama majors. Topics include the purpose of theatre, significant milestones in theatre history, basic elements and principles of production, dramatic literature, criticism, and trends in contemporary theatre.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: THEA, DRAM, ENGL
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Music Appreciation

Course Description: For the non-music major, this course is designed to provide the college student a foundation for a lifetime of enhanced appreciation and enjoyment of music. Focus content will include the elements, structure and history of music, with significant emphasis on developing listening skills and acquiring a basic repertoire of music from a variety of music literature examples.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  MUS
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Environmental History

Course Description:This course investigates the development of natural and built environments in modern times. The problems of global warming are a recent manifestation of environmental problems. Institutional, cultural, and political changes came with the construction of cities, industries, and infrastructures, resulting in problems with air, water, land, and energy. These local and global environmental issues may reflect an unsustainable relationship with nature.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: HIST, POLISCI, GOVT, GEOG, ENVR
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Social & Behavioral Sciences

American Politics

Course Description:This course provides students an introduction to American government and politics, emphasizing both the practical aspects of governmental operations and the understanding of politics as an ongoing, active process. Arranged topically, the course explores the nature and functions of government, politics, and governmental organization. Civil liberties, civil rights, the role of the media and industry, and public opinion are also covered.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  POLS, GOVT
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Comparative Politics

Course Description: This course introduces the comparative analysis of politics. It studies the political cultures, structures and processes of politics in diverse parts of the world in order to compare how the nations emerged and developed, how the culture of a society influences politics in that nation, and how various national structures affect a nation’s ability to determine policy goals and attempt to implement them. It also seeks to bring some coherence to the analysis of an otherwise diverse array of system types, and to heighten sensitivity to matters of race, class, and gender and increase tolerance for different cultures.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  POLS, GOVT
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Cultural Anthropology

Course Description: The study of human behavior from a cross cultural perspective. Emphasis is placed on non Western societies. Areas that may be covered are social organization, belief systems and ritual behavior, socialization, psychological anthropology, economic organization, social stratification, theory, and other selected topics. A goal of the course is to create a greater degree of cross cultural awareness by attempting to promote an understanding of and appreciation for the richness and diversity of human culture.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  ANTH, SOC
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Global Health

Course Description: This course examines the cultural, political, economic, and geographic contexts of global health. Seminars and readings include investigations of how policy, the pharmaceutical industry, economics, and history shape current challenges and opportunities. Students will critically evaluate the impact of the social determinants of health on individuals’ lives and populations in a variety of cultures and contexts. Through active research, students will explore how the built environment influences health outcomes. We will question how societies come to define illness, and how the identification and treatment of illness occur in a politicized context in which one must take into account gender, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and societal positioning within a global economy.  Using data sets, we will actively identify important health trends and needs around the globe. As we explore these topics, we will learn more about the medical systems of a variety of cultures.  Through experiential activities, students gain dynamic perspectives on how communities define and meet their public health needs.  We will conclude with a thoughtful examination of health as a right.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  SOC, ANTH
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International Relations

Course Description:This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of international relations and the competing approaches in understanding and addressing contemporary issues and crises. The course identifies the various state and non-state actors in global politics and describes and explains their behavior as well as the structure of the international system in which they operate. Included is an examination of not only the traditional subjects of international relations, such as power, nationalism, diplomacy, and war, but also those transnational factors that have come to play a critical role in an increasingly interdependent world, such as immigration, trade and economic/financial activities, the environment, human rights, and terrorism.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  POLS, GOVT, IR
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Introduction to Business

Course Description:Students will be introduced to the world of business through discussions of marketing, accounting, production and operations management, E-Business, information technology, management, entrepreneurship, finance, human resources, business ethics, the law, risk management and insurance and the global marketplace. Various types of business entities will be examined and analyzed in the context of today’s dynamic business environment.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  BUS
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Introduction to Psychology

Course Description:Basic principles of psychology. The course includes the study of psychology in everyday life, as a basic and applied science, the theoretical approaches, and as a profession. Topics covered are learning and thinking processes, workings of the mind and body, awareness of the world, motivation, emotion, states of consciousness and human development.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  PSY
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Introduction to Sociology

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts, theoretical approaches, and methods used in sociology, and how they relate to and impact everyday life. Topics typically include the analysis of social structure, culture, social stratification (including class, race, ethnicity, age, sex, and gender), social change, global dynamics, group behavior, and socialization and the self.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  SOC
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Macroeconomics

Course Description: This introductory course provides a comprehensive overview of the economy as a whole by examining both long-run and short-run macroeconomic issues. Topics include scarcity, market systems, domestic output and national income, economic cycles, unemployment, inflation, and macroeconomic equilibrium. It also includes an examination of international trade, government stabilization policy, money and banking, and financial institutions. Students are exposed to both macroeconomic theory and contemporary macroeconomic issues. Special emphasis is placed on developing economic tools and applying those tools to understanding contemporary issues.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  ECON
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Major World Regions

Course Description: This course is a survey of regional geography. The interaction of cultural, economic, political, physical and social processes in each of the world’s major regions is explored and examined. Patterns, problems, and prospects in the world’s principal human- geographic regions are discussed.

  • Credits:coming soon
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  coming soon
Example Syllabus Coming Soon

Principles of Microeconomics

Course Description:

The study of the economic behavior at the level of individual households and firms in a market economy.  Emphasis is placed on consumer behavior, price and output, decisions of firms, and market structure.  Labor economics, government regulation, poverty, income, and health care are also examined.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  ECON
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Project Management

Course Description:

This introductory Project Management course provides conceptual and practical material necessary for project management. It focuses on the development of leadership skills in the management of project teams. Students examine project selection, organization, and planning process; communications and negotiations; and the set up and completion of projects using IT systems. The course also covers project uncertainty and risk assessment and how to modify projects based on time and resource constraints.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  BUS
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Social Problems

Course Description: This course examines a range of problematic issues facing society. Conflicting perspectives, research findings, theoretical explanations and societal responses will be discussed regarding such issues as: distribution of resources, national security, the environment, race, gender, family, the medical industry and the justice process.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  SOC, ANTH, GEOG
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Western Civilization I

Course Description: An introduction to the history of Western Civilization from the ancient world to the end of the 17th century. Particular emphasis is placed on political, economic, social and cultural developments and their influence in shaping our contemporary world.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  HIST
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Western Civilization II

Course Description:This introductory course focuses on the origins and development of civilization in the western world from the 17th century to the present. Topics include European encounters with the new world, the scientific revolution, the age of enlightenment, the development of the state, the French and Industrial Revolutions, their impact on society, the rise of nationalism, the emergence of modern society, imperialism, World War I and II, the Cold War and contemporary Europe.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  HIST
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World History

Course Description: This course is an introduction to world history from 1500 to the present, with an emphasis on global networks of trade, ideas, culture, and conflict.  Themes to be covered include, but are not limited to: capitalism, industrialism, political revolution, imperialism, colonization, war, social movements, immigration, migration, decolonization, and globalization.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping:  HIST
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Mathematics and Physical & Life Sciences

Astronomy

Course Description: Astronomy introduces physical models for gravity and light and then builds on our understanding of these phenomena to explore the motions, properties and histories of celestial objects ranging from nearby planets and stars to distant galaxies and the Universe itself.

  • Credits: 3 or 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: SCI, ASTR
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Pre-Calculus I

Course Description: 

Topics include basic concepts of algebra, equations, inequalities, problem solving, and basic polynomial, rational, and exponential functions, with emphasis on graphing techniques, algebraic and numeric properties and applications. 

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: MATH
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Calculus I

Course Description: Topics include analytic geometry, limits and continuity of functions, derivatives and applications, anti-derivatives, applications of integration, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, elementary differential equations, improper integrals, sequences and series, power series, Taylor series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates.

  • Credits: 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: MATH
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Calculus II

Course Description: Topics include analytic geometry, limits and continuity of functions, derivatives and applications, anti-derivatives, applications of integration, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, elementary differential equations, improper integrals, sequences and series, power series, Taylor series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: MATH
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Computer Science

Course Description:

This course provides a foundation in computer science for students who do not have prior computer science and programming experience. It provides essential support to permit a student to continue in Computer Science as a potential major course of study but it is also appropriate for all other students as well. Topics include the basics of computer systems’ organization, the software development life cycle in specific problem domains, the research resources available for problem solving, and the social and ethical aspects of technology. Additional topics include an introduction to the algorithm and program development process using high-level structured programming languages with hands-on computing facilities, and problem-solving using critical thinking and computational thinking skills. The course begins with an overview of the context of computing, computational operations, the computer organization and design, the basic algorithm and data structures for problem solving, the storage and transmission of data, the presentation of information, and the limitations of computing. Students learn about the design and implementation of computational systems, and the values of abstraction in critical thinking, in computational thinking, and in problem solving.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: CSCI, SCI
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Contemporary Mathematics

Course Description:This course is designed primarily for non-STEM students and will transfer as fulfilling the mathematics requirement at many four-year institutions, but not at others. It is intended to give the student an appreciation of the wide applicability of mathematics to many fields of study. Topics include quantitative reasoning and numeracy, mathematical models, statistical reasoning, patterns in nature, voting schemes, and fair division schemes with emphasis on applications.

  • Credits: 3
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: MATH
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Environmental Science

Course Description: This science-based course takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the environmental crisis that confronts us all. Topics include ecological principles, biodiversity, climate change, sustainability, renewable and non-renewable energy, water resources, air and water pollution, and solid waste management. Field studies may include restoration projects, surveys of local ecosystems and flora and fauna populations, and visits to local environmental, agricultural, or scientific facilities.

  • Credits: 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: BIO, ENVS, SCI
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General Chemistry I

Course Description: 

This course discusses atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter, and thermo-chemistry.

  • Credits: 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: CHEM, SCI
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Introduction to Biology

Course Description:

The course covers the scientific method; basic chemistry; molecular biology; genetics; evolution, the structure and function of cells; biodiversity; and evolution. 

  • Credits: 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: BIO, SCI
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Introduction to Statistics

Course Description: A general introduction to random variables, descriptive statistics, sampling theory, estimation theory, tests of hypotheses, regression and correlation.

  • Credits: 3 or 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: MATH
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Physical Geology

Course Description: 

This course explores the processes that are shaping Earth today. It examines the formation of rocks and mineral resources, the volcanic and tectonic activity that accompany release of Earth’s internal heat, and the sculpting of the planet’s surface that occurs as air, water and ice move in response to gravity and energy from the Sun. Lab activities include identification of rocks and minerals, interpretation of topographic and geologic maps, and field studies of regional geologic features.

  • Credits: 4
  • Suggested Designation Mapping: GEOL, ENVS
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Spring 2022 Courses by Semester Location

Semester In London

Courses Offered:

  • Rhetoric and Research I
  • Introduction to Business
  • Cultural Geography
  • Introduction to Theatre
  • Western Civilization I
  • Comparative Politics

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

View London Semester Page

Semester In Italy

Courses Offered:

  • Art History II
  • Introduction to Business
  • Astronomy
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • Understanding Globalization
  • Beginning Drawing

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

View Italy Semester Page

Semester In Spain

Courses Offered:

  • Public Speaking
  • Rhetoric and Research I
  • Introductory Spanish I
  • Introductory Spanish II
  • Intermediate Spanish I
  • Intermediate Spanish II
  • Western Civilizations I
  • Comparative Religion
  • Art History I
  • Comparative Politics

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

View Spain Semester Page

Semester In Costa Rica

Courses Offered:

  • Introductory Spanish I
  • Introductory Spanish II
  • Intermediate Spanish I
  • Introduction to Creative Writing
  • Beginning Digital Photography
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • Comparative Politics
  • Introduction to Ecology

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

View Costa Rica Semester Page

Fall 2022 Courses by Semester Location

Semester In London

Courses Offered:

  • Rhetoric & Research I
  • Introduction to Business
  • Introduction to Theatre
  • Introduction to Psychology
  • Principles of Communication
  • Western Civilization II
  • Comparative Religion
  • Principles of Microeconomics
  • British Literature II
  • Pre-Calculus
  • Social Problems
  • International Relations
  • Art History I
  • Calculus I

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

View London Semester Page

Semester In Italy

Courses Offered:

  • Introduction to Philosophy
  • Art History II
  • Beginning Drawing
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • Introduction to Business
  • Introduction to Biology I
  • International Relations
  • Rhetoric & Research I
  • Introduction to Statistics
  • Pre-Calculus I
  • Calculus I
  • General Chemistry I
  • Social Problems
  • Western Civilization II

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

View Italy Semester Page

Semester In Spain

Courses Offered:

  • Rhetoric & Research I
  • Art History I
  • Comparative Religion
  • Public Speaking
  • Digital Literacies
  • Social Problems
  • Western Civilization II
  • International Relations
  • Film Appreciation
  • Music Appreciation
  • Principles of Microeconomics
  • Introductory Spanish I
  • Introductory Spanish II
  • Intermediate Spanish I
  • Intermediate Spanish II

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

View Spain Semester Page

Semester In Costa Rica

Courses Offered:

  • Social Problems
  • Rhetoric & Research I
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • Beginning Digital Photography
  • Principles of Microeconomics
  • Pre-Calculus
  • Introduction to Statistics
  • Introduction to Biology I
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental History
  • International Relations
  • Introduction to Psychology
  • World History
  • Introductory Spanish I
  • Introductory Spanish II
  • Intermediate Spanish I

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

View Costa Rica Semester Page

Semester In Buenos Aires

Courses Offered:

  • Rhetoric & Research I
  • Principles of Microeconomics
  • Introduction to Psychology
  • Art History II
  • Introductory Spanish I
  • Introductory Spanish II
  • Intermediate Spanish I
  • Introduction to Biology I
  • Social Problems
  • Film Appreciation

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

View Buenos Aires Semester Page

Semester In Czech Republic

Courses Offered:

  • Rhetoric & Research I
  • Physical Geology
  • Social Problems
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Art History II
  • Digital Literacies
  • Contemporary Mathematics
  • Introduction to Psychology
  • International Relations

Please note that course credit and availability may vary based on partner college requirements and other factors. All courses and programming are subject to change. Students should work with their student success coordinators when selecting classes.

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About Our Academic Provider

Academic Quality Assurance by Accredited U.S. Universities

Verto participants earn official college credit for their courses through Verto’s Academic Provider.

Academic Providers are accredited U.S. higher education institutions who deliver the courses, award credits, maintain all official academic records, and provide an official transcript for the Verto Study Abroad Experience.

These institutions oversee course offerings, faculty hiring, academic policies, and more, to ensure the overall academic quality of Verto’s programs.

UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN (UNH)

University of New Haven logoAs a Verto Academic Provider, The University of New Haven (UNH) provides oversight to support high quality academic experiences for all Verto participants.

A private university, The University of New Haven is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE). UNH is an experienced leader and innovator in education abroad and recognized for academic excellence by The Princeton Review and the U.S. News & World Report.

All students who complete courses during the Verto Study Abroad Experience will receive an official transcript from UNH.

Academic Team

Our staff and the accomplished faculty of the Academic Providers work together to develop and deliver rigorous collegiate curriculum and support to Verto participants. Throughout the semester, students are encouraged to engage directly with the faculty during office hours and study halls. They’re also supported by Program Leaders who build community and Academic Success Coordinators who ensure students have the academic support to excel in their Verto experience and beyond.

Paige Butler, Ed.D.

Vice President of Academic Affairs

Karen Masters, Ph.D.

Director of Academic Affairs

David Collier, Ph.D.

Senior Associate Director of Academics

Janice Johnson Shephard

Senior Associate Director of Academic Success

Colleen Dutton

Assistant Director of Academic Scheduling and Registrar

Steven James Mockler

Academic Affairs Manager

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Verto Study Abroad

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Admissions & Enrollment Info